Plumbing News

Pompeii & Herculaneum

courtesy of Plumbing & Mechanical Magazine, July 1989

The Roman Empire eventually encompassed all the countries along the Mediterranean Sea, Mesopotamia, the Balkans, and most of modern Europe, including Britain. With their plumbing engineers in tow, the Romans left in their wake large – and small – scale water systems that incorporated similar-style aqueducts, lead …

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Jerusalem

courtesy of Plumbing & Mechanical Magazine, July 1989

The capital city of the ancient land of Israel is situated 2,500 feet above sea level, high along a strategic ridge of hills. In the ten centuries B.C., Jerusalem would become a buffer state between the warring factions of Assyria and Egypt, and later would be influenced …

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Greece

courtesy of Plumbing & Mechanical Magazine, July 1989

Until Philip of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great, rampaged through and destroyed the city in 432 B.C., Olynthus was a rich and flourishing metropolis, its people enjoying the luxury of the latest plumbing innovation-bathtubs. Excavations at Olynthus, in northern Greece, attest to tiled bathrooms and self-draining …

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courtesy of Plumbing & Mechanical Magazine, July 1989

President George Bush (this article was first published July 1989) can take modern conveniences for granted. The White House is like a super hotel that contains all the high-tech appliances available. It’s part of the perks that go along with being the leader of the free world. …

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Egypt

courtesy of Plumbing & Mechanical Magazine, July 1989

From ancient times, the rise and fall of the River Nile portended periods of famine or good fortune for the peoples of Egypt. Other than wells, the River Nile is the only source of water in the country. During an idyllic year, the flooding of the Nile …

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Crete

courtesy of Plumbing & Mechanical Magazine, July 1989

Across the Mediterranean Sea from Mesopotamia, the ancient people of Crete and their Minoan sea-kings were leaving their mark on the early annals of history. Between 3000-1500 B.C., their early plumbers had laid elaborate systems of sewage disposal and drainage that resemble one of today. In fact, …

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Babylonia

courtesy of Plumbing & Mechanical Magazine, July 1989

To the ancient traveler on foot or camel back, the massive walled city of Babylon and its network of canals and verdant crop lands must have loomed like a mirage in the simmering heat of the Near East sun. Adding to a disbelieving eye was a 300-ft. …

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Plagues & Epidemics

courtesy of Plumbing & Mechanical Magazine, July 1988

The first epidemic of a waterborne disease probably was caused by an infected caveman relieving himself in waters upstream of his neighbors.

Perhaps the entire clan was decimated, or maybe the panicky survivors packed up their gourds and fled from the “evil spirits” inhabiting their camp to …

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Plumbing in America

courtesy of Plumbing & Mechanical Magazine, July 1987

Baseball fans take note. Arizona’s Hohokam Park in Mesa, Ariz., may ring a bell as the spring training grounds of the Chicago Cubs baseball team. It is named for the far-flung, extinct Hohokam Indians who played their own brand of ball and worked those same fields centuries …

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